Written by: Tom Rieland
Date: May 20, 2013

AP awarded a first place honor to WOSU's Steve Brown for his story about Frances Carr, who stepped down after 29 years as director of a soup kitchen and food pantry run by Holy Family Catholic Church in Franklinton. Photo: WOSU

AP awarded a first place honor to WOSU’s Steve Brown for his story about Frances Carr, who stepped down after 29 years as director of a soup kitchen and food pantry run by Holy Family Catholic Church in Franklinton. Photo: WOSU

89.7 NPR News swept just about every reporting category and was named the Outstanding Radio News Operation by the Ohio Associated Press over the weekend. First Place Awards included:

Extraordinary Coverage of a Scheduled Event — All Sides with Ann Fisher – The Supreme Court’s Health Care Decision

Breaking News Coverage — Tom Borgerding and Steve Brown – Columbus Train Derailment

Feature Reporting — Steve Brown – Frances Carr – Angel for the Homeless

Enterprise Reporting — Debbie Holmes- Ohio’s Migrant Worker Shortage

Investigative Reporting — Mandie Trimble – Seedy Motels

Congratulations to News Director Mike Thompson and his news team for always going beyond the expected and focusing on important stories in central Ohio. We are very proud!


  • DWIGHT BOBSON

    The premise is faulty. NPR does not depend on federal funds. Local stations depend on federal funds and that’s where federal funds go. Each local station is governed by its own local community and provides programming for its local community per its local board policies and its community advisory boards, based on local needs and interests. Each station chooses to buy, or not buy, programs from individual production companies and producers, for example, American Public Media, Public Media International, NPR, Association of Independents in Public radio, etc. Each station also produces its own programs. Some local stations, mostly in rural and smaller communities, depend on federal funds for up to 50% of their budget. Stations in the larger markets may get less than 5% federal funds. So to cut federal dollars is to prevent the smallest communities the opportunity to have locally controlled public media. Based on the facts, the discussion is very different from the one being presented.