House Committee Begins Hearings On Common Core Repeal Bill

This bill is before the Rules Committee, not the Education Committee, where Republican chair Gerald Stebelton of Lancaster halted a similar measure last fall.(Photo: Flickr, ccarlstead)
This bill is before the Rules Committee, not the Education Committee, where Republican chair Gerald Stebelton of Lancaster halted a similar measure last fall.(Photo: Flickr, ccarlstead)

Hearings are scheduled to begin today on a controversial second attempt to repeal the Common Core public education standards in Ohio.

This bill is before the Rules Committee, not the Education Committee, where Republican chair Gerald Stebelton of Lancaster halted a similar measure last fall.

“I think obviously there’s a lot of opinions on this issue. And we’re going to give everyone who has one who’s a citizen of the state of Ohio – and some people who are not – an opportunity to come in and talk about this,” says Matt Huffman, a Republican from Lima who co-sponsored the repeal bill.

Huffman also chairs the House Rules Committee.

Debate about the Common Core has mostly been among Republicans – Democrats have been largely supportive overall. But the issue got new life after concern about the Common Core came up during the primaries in May. Huffman says the determination to bring the bill to his committee, instead of going back to the Education Committee, was about giving it a fresh start.

“It was essentially to start clean with a new discussion, and without some of the same contest that’s happened over the last year and a half.”

Testimony this week is scheduled to feature only the bill’s supporters. But the measure’s opponents will be watching, including Melissa Cropper, the head of the state’s largest teachers’ union, the Ohio Federation of Teachers.

“If the bill goes forward and we completely repeal Common Core, that means that all our districts that have already invested a lot of time and resources into implementing Common Core will have to start all over again, possibly in the middle of the year,” Cropper says.

Another person who will be observing with interest is Senate Education Committee chair Peggy Lehner of Kettering, who says she’s on record as being a strong support of the Common Core standards.

“Hopefully the House is going to recognize that high standards that have a certain amount of commonality across the country are important,” Lehner says.

But Gov. John Kasich has said he shares some of his fellow Republicans’ concerns about the Common Core standards, and says “maybe the hearings can reveal something on all sides and bring greater clarity.”

There are three hearings scheduled for this week, and Huffman has said he would prefer fewer but longer hearings, and that he hopes the bill will be voted out of committee later this month.

Huffman expects a vote by the full House the Tuesday after the November election.

Comments
  • Hockey

    Teacher here. I support repeal of Common Core. Why would you implement this disaster after seeing the mess in NY? Almost 60K parents opted their kids out of Common Core tests in April. Parents and teachers do not like the product and it isn’t better than the previous standards . Learn from NY’s experiences and repeal this before we disrupt students’ education further. OH teachers can simply go back to the high standards we had before. Listen to the OH people – we don’t want or need this.

    • Concerned

      I agree! I am a parent of a 3rd grader and this is a monstrosity. I don’t like the fact that our education is in the hands of politicians and “we the people” have no voice. We didn’t even get to vote on this, our minds were already made up for us. My child is not a statistic, nor should they be used as one. Has anyone seen some these math problems? They are terrible and do not make any sense. How is my 3rd grader expected to figure out these math problems, when I can’t figure them out? Some of the things that are being taught to our children are absurd as well. Such as introduction to algebra in the 2nd and 3rd grades. It’s a known fact that there are different stages of learning. Its hard for children at this age to understand, grasp and fully comprehend such things as algebra. I hear the argument all the time that our education is better now than a 100 years ago, you decide. Here’s a link of a test that was given to 8th graders a 100 years ago.

      http://intellectualfroglegs.com/check-out-this-100-year-old-test-for-8th-graders/