U.S. Supreme Court Says Challenge To Ohio Law Must Be Heard

A billboard campaign against Democratic former U.S. Rep. Steve Driehaus was abandoned before any ads went up.(Photo: Alliance Defending Freedom)
A billboard campaign against Democratic former U.S. Rep. Steve Driehaus was abandoned before any ads went up.(Photo: Alliance Defending Freedom)

The U.S. Supreme Court says an anti-abortion group can challenge an Ohio law that bars people from lying about politicians during an election.

The case was brought by the anti-abortion group Susan B. Anthony List, which claimed former Congressman Steve Driehaus’ vote from the Affordable Care Act was tantamount to supporting taxpayer-funded abortion.

That was wrong, but they still sued the state over the law, saying it impeded on free speech. Their suit was thrown out by a lower court, but the Supreme Court ruling means the case will have to be heard.

Ohio State political scientist Paul Beck says he wasn’t surprised by the high court ruling.

“Given past decision that it’s made in these kinds of general cases, it’s very solicitous of First Amendment rights,” Beck said.

Ohio is of a few states around the country with a similar law.

Comments