Traffic Camera Case Focusing On Power Limits

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear arguments on Wednesday about the future of red light camera in Ohio.(Photo: wiki commons)
The Ohio Supreme Court will hear arguments on Wednesday about the future of red light camera in Ohio.(Photo: wiki commons)

While debate over traffic cameras usually centers on whether they are aimed at increasing safety or at increasing revenues, arguments before the Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday will focus on whether cities are overstepping their powers.

The justices will hear an appeal by Toledo and its camera vendor of a lower court’s ruling for a motorist who sued over a 2009 camera-generated ticket. His lawsuit charged that the city’s administrative handling of tickets unconstitutionally bypasses the court system and violates his due-process rights.

Toledo contends that the camera systems are allowed under its self-governing “home rule” powers in the Ohio Constitution, and that motorists still have the ability to appeal administrative decisions to the courts.

It’s among a number of legal and legislative challenges to cameras in Ohio and nationally.

Comments
  • DB Hoster

    So glad this discussion is being had. Boundaries are being overstepped without a doubt. We all know it, and have felt uncomfortable about it since these things were installed.

  • jcwconsult

    “Home rule” objections mean:
    I insist upon stealing from you and others like you that make the terrible mistake to visit my area, how dare you object to the thefts?

    Toledo believes in the philosophy that it is OK for governments to steal from their citizens and visitors. The court case will decide whether fairness and justice prevail — or Toledo is allowed to continue stealing unrestricted.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association