What’s Next For Columbus City Schools?

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Pastor Dale Snyder, head of Citizens Against Issue 50 and 51, said it was indeed a "new day" for Columbus City Schools.(Photo: Sam Hendren / WOSU)
Pastor Dale Snyder, head of Citizens Against Issue 50 and 51, said it was indeed a "new day" for Columbus City Schools.(Photo: Sam Hendren / WOSU)

Did a lack of transparency or trust doom the Columbus City Schools tax levy proposal?

That’s one of the questions being weighed by supporters and opponents in the wake of the decisive defeat of the tax levy issue that was rejected by voters two-to-one on Tuesday.

The Columbus City Schools levy would have meant a substantial increase in property taxes. Given the current economic climate, it was an idea that 80-year-old John Conti says he could not accept.

“You’ve got property taxes; you’ve got to pay it. And I feel that education is failing everybody.”

Rhonda Johnson, head of the Columbus Education Association, and a vocal supporter of the issue, said Wednesday on All Sides with Ann Fisher that she thought voters had lost confidence in the school system.

“I think it boils down to the trust because when the community puts their trust in us we do better at the polls and I just think there was a lack of trust,” Johnson said.

Opponents on Wednesday said there was plenty of evidence for the public’s lost confidence. Byron L. Potts of the group “Citizens Against Issue 50 and 51,” wondered why administrators were silent when a budget surplus surfaced.

“You told us that you had a $19.1 million deficit. And then, ironically or suddenly you found a $51 million surplus.

Listen to the story above for more on the future of Columbus City Schools.

 

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