Ohio EPA Chief Says Pressure From Coal Industry Forced Resignation

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George Elmaraghy has been with the Ohio EPA for 38 years. He says he was forced to resign because of pressure from the coal industry.(Photo: Ohio EPA)
George Elmaraghy has been with the Ohio EPA for 38 years. He says he was forced to resign because of pressure from the coal industry.(Photo: Ohio EPA)

The official in charge of protecting Ohio’s streams and lakes has been asked to step down because of what he describes as pressure from the coal industry.

Long- time head of the division of surface water, George Elmaraghy, told employees in an email that he was asked to resign by the Gov. John Kasich and Ohio EPA director Scott Nally, effective September 13.

Elmaraghy has been with the agency 38 years according to former co-worker Jed Thorp. Thorp now works for the Sierra Club, but spent 5 years in the surface water division under Elmaragy.

I think in the short term, George’s resignation could probably been seen as a victory for the coal industry.

“It’s my expectation that if this is why George was asked to step down they’re going to replace him with someone who is more amenable to what the coal industry wants to see done.”

Elmaraghy’s letter says “There has been considerable pressure from the coal companies over the last year for the division to accommodate the industry’s needs…”

Ohio EPA spokeswoman Carol Hestor declined to comment on why Elmaraghy was asked to resign, but she says permits to impact waterways have sufficient review.

“We simply want people to understand that the checks and balances that are part of the permitting process are in effect here as in any other situation involving a permitter action of the agency.”

The outgoing Elmaraghy’s letter says he believes the coal industry’s interpretation of the federal Clean Water Act and state water pollution laws has made it difficult for the division to protect Ohio’s streams.

Comments
  • Michael Dalton

    George Elmaraghy is a good steward of the environment and is extremely knowledgable of both the regulations and pollution control methods. This is a travesty and recalls the days of Governor Rhodes and the “Coal Dust Twins.” All industies struggle to comply with stringent water pollution regulations, but apparently the coal industry can order, or buy, a governor to intervene on their behalf. If the man responsible for ensuring compliance with state pollution regulations won’t allow non-compliance, then fire him and get someone who is more cooperative. The coal industry wins and everyone that likes clean water loses. What could be more fair?