Life At Ohio State Remains Routine Despite Violent Threats

Ohio State graduate student Jillian Baer reads a book at the Ohio Union. Baer was among hundreds of other students who attended classes, meetings and dined at university restaurants despite a second online violent threat in less than a week.(Photo: Mandie Trimble, WOSU News Reporter)
Ohio State graduate student Jillian Baer reads a book at the Ohio Union. Baer was among hundreds of other students who attended classes, meetings and dined at university restaurants despite a second online violent threat in less than a week.(Photo: Mandie Trimble, WOSU News Reporter)

Ohio State University Police have ramped up their presence on campus after another online threat surfaced Sunday night. WOSU reports students are going about daily routines with little worry.

For the second time in less than a week, OSU cafeterias are the target of violent threats such as explosions or shootings. So far, neither threat has been carried out.

OSU Police Deputy Chief Richard Mormon said they’re trying to confirm whether the threats, which were posted on an Internet chat site, are related.

“We can’t say without a doubt they are the same person,” Mormon said. “But they are very similar in nature, and the threats are very similar.”

The threats have not hindered students from eating at campus restaurants, including Ohio Union Market.

Senior Abby Evans and freshman Adrienne Hennessy lunch together between their classes. Neither woman said they’re very concerned.

“Since it happened last week and nothing seemed to go on, and so this second one, I’m kind of like, well, I think we’ll be OK,” Evans said.

Hennessy added, “I like the fact that they have police cars all over the place. It means that, you know, we’re guarded. We’re safe.”

Around the corner, Junior David Walker peers out the window toward construction near the South Oval while he eats lunch. Walker sayid he thinks University Police have taken adequate precaution.

“They said it was just a chat room. I think if they felt like if it was worse than what it was they would have closed [campus],” Walker said.

Graduate student Jillian Baer, who said she has taken several courses on threat assessment, also said she doesn’t think the threats are significant, so Baer decided not to cancel a meeting and lunch plans at the Union Monday afternoon.

“Not to sound naïve or overly optimistic, but if somebody really wanted to do harm on a campus or to other students, they’re not going to publically explain that.”

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