Red-Light Cameras Become Big Money Maker For Columbus

The city says the red-light cameras are not about making money, but about improving safety at some of the most dangerous intersections.(Photo: Flickr)
The city says the red-light cameras are not about making money, but about improving safety at some of the most dangerous intersections.(Photo: Flickr)

Red-light cameras are proving to be a money-maker for the city of Columbus.

A record number of citations issued to red-light runners brought in $2.1 million last year – more than the previous two years combined. Red-light fines totaled about $1.1 million in 2011.

The city has added 20 cameras at intersections over the past two years, and now has a total of 38.

The city says the red-light cameras are not about making money, but about improving safety at some of the most dangerous intersections.

The city says crashes at the first 18 intersections to get cameras have dropped by more than 75 percent each year between 2008 and 2011.

Red-light and speed cameras are used in more than 500 U.S. municipalities.

Comments
  • http://www.facebook.com/peterboyle.4848 Peter Boyle

    One more way for government to suck the money out of your wallet. If my sister-in-law drives my car and runs a light (questionably) who gets the ticket? To clear my record do I have to ‘inform’ on her? Do they run facial recognition software on picture from that camera, tack you movements around town? Who actually gets the money, the camera company or the city. This is a bad idea perpetuated by more and more cities and towns across America, and has been struck down in several states.