Curriculum Change Divides Statehouse

Republicans and Democrats are split over what documents to include in any new curriculum.(Photo: Flickr)
Republicans and Democrats are split over what documents to include in any new curriculum.(Photo: Flickr)

Ohio high school students would face more stringent requirements to read the state and federal constitutions, the Declaration of Independence and other historical documents under a bill under consideration in the Ohio House.

State curriculum and proficiency test standards already require classroom instruction on such fundamental documents, beginning in fourth grade.

The Ohio Christian Alliance and other critics say the information is filtered through summaries and analysis that give a flawed view. They’re backing the new “founding documents” bill, which would require children to read the original texts.

Opponents object to the bill’s failure to list the Bill of Rights, Emancipation Proclamation and other historical texts. Others say it will mean extra work and cost for school districts and teachers.

Comments
  • Bobkro

    Oh, finally, here’s a jobs bill from the Ohio legislature!! Think of all the printers to be re-employed to put out these study documents; especially that catch-all disaster called the Ohio constitution – a document that I’d say more than 95% of Ohioans have never even taken a look at, much less read through (if they could stay awake in so doing).

  • JB III

    I fully support our students understanding the underpinnings of the political system of their country. However, I think they need a full understanding, not just what our legislature (given their apparent lack of understanding of their role in doing the people’s business) deems appropriate. When I took Civics in high school, yes at one point in our history civics was a required class, we were required to be able to discuss intelligently the foundations of our country and what is required to insure our political system continues to function.