Ohio Supreme Court Throws Out Changes To Sex Offender Law

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The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled the state's strict sex offender notification law cannot be imposed on defendants whose crimes were committed before the law was enacted.(Photo: Sam Howzit (flickr))
The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled the state's strict sex offender notification law cannot be imposed on defendants whose crimes were committed before the law was enacted.(Photo: Sam Howzit (flickr))

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled the state’s strict sex offender notification law cannot be imposed on defendants whose crimes were committed before the law was enacted.

The case stems from a 2007 law known as Senate Bill 10 that changed the way many offenders were classified, even years after being convicted and even if their classification was part of a plea deal. Katherine Szudy is with the state public defender’s office. She represented a man who saw his reporting requirements changed retroactively.

“Not only did his temporal length of registration enhance, but only the severity and number of restraints to that registration markedly increased,” Szudy said.

The change followed a federal law passed a year earlier, but the Wednesday ruling only applies to language in the Ohio constitution.

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