BMV Report: No Evidence Of Deals For OSU Players

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Former starting quarterback Terrell Pryor prepares to throw the ball at an Ohio State football game. An NCAA scandal led Pryor to choose not to return to OSU for his senior year season.(Photo: Tyler Branch (flickr))
Former starting quarterback Terrell Pryor prepares to throw the ball at an Ohio State football game. An NCAA scandal led Pryor to choose not to return to OSU for his senior year season.(Photo: Tyler Branch (flickr))

The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles says it’s found no evidence that Ohio State football players got special deals on cars.

The 65-page report released Tuesday ends by saying BMV investigators found dealer sales records and car titles accurately reflect the price of vehicles sold to OSU players and their families.

The BMV and Ohio State launched investigations after reports that several players and their relatives bought cars from two Columbus dealerships: Jack Maxton Chevrolet and Auto Direct. The BMV report says Auto Direct made money on all 10 sales to OSU players and families, and Jack Maxton profited on 14 of 15 sales; the only sale that lost money was for a vehicle that had been on the lot more than five months.

Investigators also did not find evidence that memorabilia or game tickets were used as compensation in any sales.

The BMV report is separate from an ongoing investigation by the NCAA. The scandal has already forced out head coach Jim Tressel and starting quarterback Terrelle Pryor.

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