Titanic Violin Sells for $1.7 Million at Auction

A memorial erected in Wallace Hartley's memory in his hometown of Colne, Lancashire, England(Photo: By Poliphilo (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons)
A memorial erected in Wallace Hartley's memory in his hometown of Colne, Lancashire, England(Photo: By Poliphilo (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons)

You might remember a short time ago that a violin purportedly owned by Wallace Hartley, bandmaster on the ill-fated ship, had been located.  You might also remember there were many who were skeptical as to it’s authenticity.

That did not stop bidders at British auction house Henry Aldridge & Son from opening their wallets.  The winning bidder, identified only as a “British collector of Titanic items,” has added what many would consider a prime piece to his collection.

Wallace Hartley’s violin went through seven years of painstaking research before it was determined that it was, indeed, authentic.

Much has been written about the ship, it’s passengers, and the ill-fated voyage, but one author decided the band needed to be given it’s due.  Author Steve Turner, who has written much about music and pop culture, released a book a couple of years ago called The Band that Played On: The Extraordinary Story of the 8 Musicians Who Went Down with the Titanic.  It is fascinating reading for those who want to know more about Wallace Hartley and his band.

Below is a fascinating piece from 1975 by Gavin Bryars called The Sinking of the Titanic.  Depicted musically is, of course, Wallace Hartley’s band, along with the sounds the ship might have made as it groaned under the tremendous strains brought to bear by the ocean waters.

Read Titanic Violin Sells at auction for $1.7 Million (All Things Strings)

Listen to The Sinking of the Titanic by Gavin Bryars.

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