Crying Child Brings Dayton Philharmonic Concert to a Halt

Disturbance Causes Another Conductor to Stop Mid-Performance

Dayton Philharmonic conductor Neil Gittleman had just started the first piece on the program, Debussy’s Prelude to “The Afternoon of a Faun,” when he’d had enough.

 The youngster had been wailing for quite some time when Gittleman stopped the music, turned to the audience, and asked that the child be removed. Some audience members applauded.

What do you think?  Should conductors stop performances for cell phones, crying babies, or other disturbances if they are persistent problems?

Read Dayton Orchestra Concert Incident Sparks Debate (Dayton Daily News)

Philadelphia Has New Conductor, New Recording Contract

Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s first full season as the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Music Director doesn’t begin until next season, but he is already causing excitement to ripple through music lovers in Philly and beyond.

In a recent interview, Nézet-Séguin announced that the Philadelphia Orchestra will record for the prestigious Deutsche Grammophon label.

Read Philadelphia Orchestra’s New Leader Announces 2012-2013 Season (philly.com)

Watch Yannick Nézet-Séguin in rehearsal with the Philadelphia Orchestra

Chinese Conductor Slugs It Out With Attacker

Long Yu was in New York City to conduct a Chinese New Years concert.  As he walked with a friend after supper, he was punched by a man trying to bum a cigarette.  That did not go over well.

Read On Eve of Philharmonic Concert, Chinese Conductor Slugs It Out With Attacker (NY Times)

Comments
  • Gerald

    Whose fault is it when a crying child disrupts a concert so much that the conductor has to stop the performance?  Not the conductor; he’s trying to make for a pleasant listening experience.  Not the child’s guardian; he or she may not know any better than to take a small child to a concert.  The management of the theater has an obligation to the audience to not admit people who clearly have no business attending a classical concert.  Members of the audience need to contact the theater to say in no uncertain terms that they have to have some age limit for those who attend concerts.

  • Gerald

    Whose fault is it when a crying child disrupts a concert so much that the conductor has to stop the performance?  Not the conductor; he’s trying to make for a pleasant listening experience.  Not the child’s guardian; he or she may not know any better than to take a small child to a concert.  The management of the theater has an obligation to the audience to not admit people who clearly have no business attending a classical concert.  Members of the audience need to contact the theater to say in no uncertain terms that they have to have some age limit for those who attend concerts.