“Celebrating American Symphonies” Winding Down This Week

All during the month of August, we’ve been celebrating American symphonies on Symphony @ 7 on Classical 101. We’re winding down now for the final week.  Yesterday, we had Aaron Copland’s Third Symphony, and for the rest of the week, it’s symphonies by Jerome Moross, Adolphus Hailstork, George Whitefield Chadwick, and Dan Locklair.

Jerome Moross is probably best remembered for his film scores, particularly for The Big Country from 1958, for which he received an Academy Award nomination, but he also wrote fine music for the theater, television and the concert hall.  On this evening’s program, we have Jerome Moross’s Symphony No. 1 from 1942.  It’s from a new reissue from Albany Records, originally released in 1993, and was timed for release on August 1, coinciding with the centennial of Moross’s birth on that date in 1913.

The symphony was composed between December 1941 and April of 1942 and was Moross’s creative response to America’s entry into the Second World War.  The composer said that “many people were feeling gloomy about the war and I thought it was right to try to cheer them up with a happy and hopeful piece.  I realized the seriousness of the situation but I did not believe in being downhearted.”

Join me for the final few days of our celebration of American music on Symphony @ 7.  This evening, after the symphony by Jerome Moross, we also have music from Charles Ives and George Frederick McKay.

 

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