Bernard Greenhouse’s Beloved Cello Gets Good Home at Record Price

Canadian Arts Patroness to Lend Cello to Budding Montreal Musician

The cello played for a half-century by one of the founding members of the Beaux Arts Trio has been sold to a “patroness of the arts from Montreal,” who declined to be identified further.  Once the loan arrangements are finalized, the Countess of Stainlein, ex-Paganini of 1707, will be played by Stéphane Tétreault, an 18-year-old player from Montreal with a budding career.

Read A Beloved Set of Strings Goes to a Good Home (NY Times)

See & Hear Greenhouse’s cello

Watch Stéphane Tétreault play Piatti

The Therapeutic Powers of Music

Composer Tod Machover sees many practical uses for music in the healing arts saying, as an example, that music is often the last thing Alzheimer’s sufferers recognize. In a speech last week, while he was at UC Santa Barbara (“Music, Mind and Health: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Well-being through Active Sound”), Machover stated that music “touches on just about every aspect of cognition.”

LA Times Music Critic Mark Swed spoke extensively with Machover.

Read Musical Therapy is Making Breakthroughs (LA Times)

Early Music Gets a Financial Shot in the Arm

Julliard School recently announced a $20 million dollar endowment, given to fund graduate-level studies in historical performance.  Bruce Kovner, Chairman of Julliard’s board,  has also donated a priceless collection of manuscripts to Juilliard, (in 2006).

Mr. Kovner has long been enamored of “the great literature of the Baroque,” he said, and he thought it an appropriate area for Juilliard to take on.

The Times opines that he is not alone in thinking that — thanks in large part to the Juilliard program — early music now “has a center of gravity” and “serious levels of accomplishment” in New York.

Read Julliard School Announces $20 million Dollar Gift for Early Music (NY Times)

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