Book Review: More Moore

"Bite Me: A Love Story" by Christopher Moore.(Photo: Book cover)
"Bite Me: A Love Story" by Christopher Moore.(Photo: Book cover)

 

During the latter half of the summer in 2008, my fiancé Jason and I decided to go on a trip to California to visit my uncle.  During the week-long stay we toured Alcatraz, sailed on a sunset cruise in the San Francisco bay, and visited Monterey Bay aquarium.  All of these adventures were a blast, but I will never forget the night we walked down Castro Street.

As we walked down the torch-lit street, we came across an interesting book store called Books Inc.  As we wandered through the aisles of the book store, I came across a section titled “staff favorites.”  It was here that I found a book titled A Dirty Job.  This book had a black cover with a skeleton toddler holding a scythe sitting up in a bassinet.  Certainly not something you see every day.

With my attention piqued, I opened the cover and found I could not put the book down.  It was a humorous novel about a man who is unknowingly recruited to be the Grimm Reaper. It was at that point I knew I was about to be $15 poorer.

During the few days that remained of our trip to California, I finished the “little black book” and was determined to search for a similar book to read when we arrived back in Ohio.  I went to Barnes and Nobel and was ecstatic when I found out that the author, Christopher Moore, had a slew of other books already published.

I bought his novel Bloodsucking Fiends, a comical piece about a woman—turned vampire—and the man she finds to do her “day light” errands.   Once I finished this book, I went back for its sequel You Suck that is about the errand-running man from the previous novel who is turned into a vampire too.

Moore’s books are full of wit, chaos, and subversion.  They are light, easy reads that anyone can enjoy.  Early this year the third installment of the undead series Bite Me was released.  I bought it the minute it arrived on the shelf.

In an interview with NPR’s Neal Conan in a 2009 Moore said, “I’m not nearly as outrageously brave as many of my rascals that I write, but I think the rascal spirit must reside in me somewhere.”

The wickedly funny tone of his novels showcases that there most certainly a rascal residing within him.

You can listen to the whole interview at: http://www.npr.org/templates/player/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t=1&islist=false&id=125676630&m=125676613

 

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