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Beyond the Gridiron
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Interviewee Profiles
Archie Griffin

Archie Griffin
Archie Griffin, whose name became inextricably representative of Buckeye success, nearly missed the chance to play for Ohio State, unconvinced that Coach Hayes truly wanted him. He had always envisioned wearing scarlet and gray, and he “grew up dreaming of playing at Ohio State, but that’s exactly what it was—a dream.” When Hayes did approach the Griffin family, he characteristically emphasized the importance of an education as well, and Griffin’s father remarked to his son “well, don’t you think he’s concerned about other things, not just you running up and down a football field?” Griffin won two Heisman trophies, a feat never since duplicated and was one of four Buckeyes ever to be named All-American three times. He still holds the OSU record for career yards rushing, 5,589 and is the only player in collegiate history to start four Rose Bowl games. In addition to being inducted into the OSU Athletic Hall of Fame, Griffin was also named to the National Football Hall of Fame, the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame, and the College Football Hall of Fame. He currently heads up the OSU Alumni Association.


Anne Hayes Hoyt

Anne Hayes Hoyt
Anne Hayes Hoyt is the daughter of Ike Hayes, Woody’s brother. When Ike passed away, the young girl went to live with the Hayes in Columbus. Her memories of Woody brings a personal glimpse of the Coach.


Rex Kern

Rex Kern
Still ranked as one of OSU’s greatest quarterbacks, Rex Kern led his team to three national championship games. Kern set the OSU total offense record as a junior, finished his Buckeye career with 3,990 total yards, and was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame. One of 12 scholar-athletes chosen by the National Football Foundation, Kern also earned his Ph.D from Ohio State. Injuries cut his professional football career short, but he managed to play every game his rookie season with Baltimore in 1971. Kern retired from football in 1972 after failing his physical examination with the Buffalo Bills.


Greg Lashutka

Greg Lashutka
Greg Lashutka was co-captain of the Buckeye football team in 1965 and later played professionally for the Buffalo Bills. He earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1967 and a juris doctorate from Capital University Law School. Lashutka served as Columbus City Attorney and was elected mayor of Columbus, Ohio, in 1991 and reelected in 1995. He did not seek a third term as mayor in 1997, primarily because of his health concerns after suffering a heart attack. Lashutka joined Nationwide, Inc. in January 2000.


Alan Natali

Alan Natali
Natali earned his B.A. in English in 1974 and his M.A. in English from California University of Pennsylvania in 1979. Natali was Cal U's sports information director in the early 1980's before becoming a faculty member in the English department in 1985. Natali is an award-winning author, and in 1980, he began working for Ohio Magazine as a full-time contributing editor. In 1995, Alan, the former team captain and all-state linebacker at Cal U, published his first book, Woody's Boys: Twenty Famous Buckeyes Talk Among Themselves.


Jack Nicklaus

Jack Nicklaus
Jack Nicklaus, born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio, also known as "The Golden Bear," was the major force in professional golf from the 1960s into the 1980s. Nicklaus, who grew up on the fairways of Scioto Country Club off Lane Avenue, attended and played college golf at Ohio State and quickly established himself as the game's dominant force. In 1980, when people were wondering if the 40-year-old Golden Bear had lost his touch, he won his fourth U.S. Open and his fifth PGA Championship. He is the only person in the history of the PGA to win all four major championships in the PGA Tour and Senior Tour.


Daryl Sanders

Daryl Sanders
Daryl Sanders was born in Canton, Ohio and played tackle, end, and middle guard. He was named a national champion by the Football Writers Association. Sanders received an honorable mention for All-American and played in the North-South Shrine game, Senior Bowl, Coaches’ All-America game, and College All-Star game. Sanders was drafted number one by Detroit in 1963 and because starter at offensive tackle his rookie year where he was rated as one of the NFL’s strongest linemen. He retired, however, after his fourth season to pursue other interests. At 44, a board of pastors agreed that Sanders was destined for the ministry and Sanders began the Zion Christian Fellowship Church. Sanders maintained his relationship with Hayes and remained among the few nonfamily members to speak with the ex-coach after his dismissal following the Gator Bowl.


Bo Schembechler

Bo Schembechler
Bo Schembechler grew up in Barberton, Ohio, and earned his degree from the Miami University of Ohio, where he lettered in football and baseball. Bo first met Hayes as a collegiate athlete and played under him while at Miami. He then went on to earn his master’s degree in 1952 from Ohio State, while serving as a graduate assistant coach under Hayes until 1953. He spent five seasons as an assistant to Woody Hayes before accepting the head coaching job at Miami in 1963. He remained there, winning two Mid-American Conference Championships, until becoming the head football coach of the Wolverines and spent 21 memorable seasons leading his team to victory and suspenseful clashes with the now-rival OSU Buckeyes. Bo Schembechler was inducted into the Miami University Hall of Fame in 1972, the State of Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1989, the University of Michigan Hall of Honor in 1992, the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1993 and the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame in 1993.


Jim Tressel

Jim Tressel
Coach Jim Tressel has built Ohio State into a national contender almost overnight. Now in his third year with the Buckeyes, his two-year resume in Columbus includes an overall record of 21-5, a perfect 14-0 season, a Big Ten co-championship and the 2002 National Championship. Last year, Ohio State literally came from out of nowhere to capture the school’s, and the Big Ten’s, first consensus national title since 1968. The Buckeyes achieved the elusive title by posting a 13-0 regular-season record and then upsetting top-ranked Miami in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 3 in a 31-24 double-overtime thriller. He was named National Coach of the Year by the America Football Coaches Association (an award he won three times at Division 1-AA Youngstown State), thus becoming the first person in the history of the AFCA to win that honor at two different schools. He also received the Eddie Robinson National Coach of the Year Award from the Football Writers Association of America. Additionally, Tressel was selected as the Bobby Dodd and the Paul “Bear” Bryant National Coach of the Year. He also was the choice of the Touchdown Club of Columbus and the Pigskin Club of Washington D.C. as National Coach of the Year.

(Information about interviewees were drawn in part from the following sources: Woody Hayes: The Man & His Dynasty, edited by Mike Bynum; I Remember Woody: Recollections of The Man They Called Coach Hayes, by Steve Greenberg and Dale Ratermann; and Woody Hayes and the 100-Yard War by Jerry Brondfield; and Woody’s Boys: 20 Famous Buckeyes Talk Amongst Themselves, by Alan Natali.)


The Road to Columbus
Politician
Teacher
Military Man
Humanitarian
Controversy
After Coaching
Interviewee Profiles

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